The ABC will investigate whether this week’s episode of Q&A breached editorial standards, after receiving hundreds of complaints about the language and views presented during the 75-minute discussion.

But columnist and author Mona Eltahawy, one of the guests on the panel, says people upset with the program should direct their rage towards real instances of violence and not the “rhetorical” or “imaginary” scenarios she and others brought up during the show.

Q&A guest Mona Eltahawy says people upset with Monday night's episode should focus their rage on real instances of violence and not "rhetorical" or "imaginary" scenarios.

Q&A guest Mona Eltahawy says people upset with Monday night’s episode should focus their rage on real instances of violence and not “rhetorical” or “imaginary” scenarios.Credit:Angel Garcia

The episode, which aired on Monday, was broadcast from Melbourne in partnership with The Wheeler Centre’s feminist ideas festival Broadside. On the panel, moderated by the ABC’s Fran Kelly, Eltahawy asked, “How long must we wait for men and boys to stop murdering us, to stop beating us and to stop raping us? How many rapists must we kill?”

Later, Indigenous writer Nayuka Gorrie spoke about the oppression faced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, saying, “We’ve tried for 230-plus years to appeal to the colonisers’ morality which doesn’t seem to exist. I think violence … is OK because if someone is trying to kill you, there’s no amount of, ‘Oh, but I’m really clever.’ You know, ‘I’m really articulate.’ No amount of that is going to save you. So, yeah, let’s burn stuff.”



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